INSTRUCTIONS

The Water Only Method - (The Topdressing/No-Till Method is located half way down the page)

Step 1: Pick a base soil to add the Soil Charge Pack to. Recommended options are listed below. Amounts are listed for 7.5-gallons of base soil - scale the recipes up as needed. Small sized Soil Charge Packs will amend 7.5-gallons of base soil for a water only grow. Large sized Soil Charge Packs will amend 30-gallons of base soil for a water only grow. *Tip-If you’re using other base soil recipes be sure to use 25-35% worm castings, vermi-compost and/or high-quality compost.

*When using high quality bagged soil like Roots, Nectar #4, Fox Farm, Happy Frog, Kings Gold, etc.

  • 6 ¼-gallons of commercial bagged soil

  • 1 ¼ gallons of worm castings

*When using homemade soil.

  • 2.5-gallons of sphagnum peat moss

  • 2.5-gallons of aeration amendment (pumice, perlite, vermiculite, lava rock, rice hulls etc.)

  • 2.5-gallons of worm castings or vermi-compost. (or a mix of the two)

  • 1 Cup of Oyster Shell Flour (We have Oyster Shell Flour Packs available if you can’t source this locally) Click Here

*When reusing and recycling your nice organic soil.

  • 6-gallons of used soil, old roots and all!

  • 1-gallon of worm castings

  • ½-gallon of aeration amendment (pumice, vermiculite, lava rock, rice hulls etc.)

Step 2: After you have your base soil, pour the appropriately sized Soil Charge Pack onto your pile of soil. Mix everything together well, a tarp and small rake work great for this. We recommend wearing a dust mask during mixing. After mixing add de-chlorinated water to make moist. Add enough water to make the soil clump up when squeezed into a ball and then crumble apart when released.

Step 3: Let the soil sit and rest 4 weeks, longer is completely fine just keep it from drying out. Preferably in temps of 60°f - 80°f - indoors or outdoors, wrapped in a tarp or stored in drums/totes with the lids cracked open. These 4 weeks will let the Ph stabilize as the microbes get settled into their new homes, gain populations, and start breaking down the Soil Charge Pack ingredients.  That’s it!

Use this finished soil for rooted clones, 1-gallon containers, all the way to your final transplant – just add water.

*Tip- When starting seed(s) we suggest using a light soil mix such as a mix of equal parts Peat/Pumice/Compost. Then transplant into the nutrient dense soil as they grow out of the seed starting container.

For most indoor growers we recommend to use a 7-gallon final container or larger. For most outdoor growers we recommend to use a 40-gallon final container/hole or larger. Here are some guidelines.

A desired/estimated final plant height of 24” - 36” use 7-10 gallons of soil

A desired/estimated final plant height of 36” - 48” use 10-20 gallons of soil

A desired/estimated final plant height of 48” - 60” use 20-30 gallons of soil

A desired/estimated final plant height of 60” - 72” use 35-45 gallons of soil

A desired/estimated final plant height of 72”+ use 50+ gallons

* Add Endo Mycorrhizae powder during any transplants (recommended), just sprinkle a little bit onto the roots of the transplant going in. This can be ordered on Amazon, look for Xtreme Gardening RTI RT4420 Mykos, 2.2-Pound Bag or similar if you choose to add this.

 

*No flushing before harvest, just keep adding water like normal. The Soil Charge Pack ingredients are carbon based and not man-made synthetics full of salts so there is nothing to flush out of the soil. This is living organics!

 

About Your Water Source:

We recommend using chlorine/chloramine free water as to not hurt the living soil microbes. Contact your water company for a water quality report (some are online). If your water has chlorine simply let your water sit out for 24 hours before use so the chlorine can evaporate, it’s nice to add a small fish tank air bubbler to the water while it’s sitting for 24hrs. If your water has chloramine instead of chlorine then we suggest using an R/O filter system to reduce it. If the Ph of your water source is somewhere between 5.9-7.4 (most of America) you won’t need to adjust it or even check it again! The Ph up, and Ph down bottled products kill the soil life. IF you need to lower the Ph of your water use Citric Acid powder from the health food store. IF you need to raise the Ph of your water use Baking Soda. We do suggest to check the Ph of your water at first as there are many different water sources in the world, but the real fact here is that most people will never need to adjust, or even test the Ph of their water again. When we let the plant communicate with a living soil the microbes in the living soil take care of the Ph for us! This simply comes down to the quality of the earth worm castings or compost used when first mixing the soil. Finally, you can get rid of that finicky expensive Ph pen!

 

*A very basic compost tea is always a nice addition as it adds so much great diverse life to your soil, but not a requirement in this system. Remember, the only requirement in this grow system is to add water. (click here for Compost Tea Recipe)

 

*Reusing your soil tip - If the old root mass is too solid to break apart then let it dry out for a week.

*General Tip - If you run a perpetual garden then we suggest you make up 2 batches of new soil, then as you get into a rotation and schedule with your plants you can re-amend used soil so that by the time you pull the crop out you have your old soil with nutrients and minerals all ready to go. Repeat the cycle over and over. Just plant and add water! That’s it!

*General Tip – Do not add any synthetic bottled nutrients as this will kill the soil life.

*General Tip - Start your own worm farm to get almost free worm castings/vermi-compost! It is very easy and doesn't smell indoors. This really cuts down on the cost of growing organically and naturally – significantly.

*General Tip – Take a few worms out of your worm farm and add then directly to your growing containers, putting worms into your containers and then adding any extra leaves and stems as mulch during the grow is excellent for soil life. When growing outdoors always use some kind of mulch layer on top of the bare soil like straw, leaves, compost, clover, etc.

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The Topdressing/No-Till Method

This is the topdressing/no-till method. This method is great when you don’t have time to let the soil sit and rest 4-weeks or longer like the water only method requires. With this method you can plant seeds or young plants directly into the soil the same day you mix the soil. Then simply top-dress the Soil Charge Packs ingredients once a month all the way to your organic harvest. Another huge benefit to this method is that after harvest; instead of physically remixing and re-amending your used soil you will simply leave your soil right there in the same container and cut out a new hole for a new plant to go in. There is no-tilling of the soil. This soil will be reused over and over as long as you would like, it will just keep getting better and stronger. Indoors use a 15-gallon container or larger. Outdoors use a 40-gallon container/hole in the ground/raised bed or larger. The idea with the topdressing/no-till method is to plant seeds/clones/young plants right into their final container instead of transplanted up into larger containers as the plants grow. Just plant once and then top-dress all the way from vegetative growth, through the bloom phase until harvest in that same container. Fabric pots are perfect for this style of growing with the root pruning abilities in a continuously used no-till growing container. Repeat this same cycle over and over as long as you want for years! How easy and organic is that!

 

Step 1: This is your starting point when making new soil from scratch.

*If you’re using other soil recipes be sure to use 25-35% worm castings, Vermi-compost and/or high-quality compost.

SOIL RECIPE TO MAKE 7.5-GALLONS OF LIVING SOIL – SCALE UP AS NEEDED

  • 2.5-gallons of Sphagnum Peat Moss

  • 2.5-gallons of Aeration Amendment (Pumice, Lava Rock, Rice Hulls etc.)

  • 2.5-gallons of Worm Castings or Vermi-Compost (or a mix of the two)

  • 1 cup of Oyster Shell Flour (We have Oyster Shell Flour Packs available if you can’t source this locally) Click Here

  • 2 cups of the Soil Charge Pack Ingredients

If you can’t source the items for homemade soil you can use high quality bagged soil like Roots, Nectar #4, Fox Farm, Happy Frog, Kings Gold, etc.

  • 6 ¼-gallons of high quality commercial bagged soil

  • 1 ¼ gallons of worm castings

  • 1 cup of the Soil Charge Pack ingredients

Step 2: Mix everything together well, a tarp and small rake work great for this. We recommend wearing a dust mask during mixing. After mixing add de-chlorinated water to make moist. Don’t add to much water, just moist soil is what we are going for. Then add the soil to your containers, raised beds, or holes in the ground. Store extra soil in food grade totes or drums with the lid cracked open, or simply wrapped in a tarp. Keep the soil moist during storage.

Step 3: Plant your seeds, rooted clones, or young plants. After planting, top-dress 2 Tbls of the Soil Charge Pack ingredients per plant evenly around the base of the plant, keep it at least 3-4” from the stalk. *Optional but recommended - Add Endo Mycorrhizae powder during the transplant, just sprinkle a little bit onto the roots of the transplant going in. This can be ordered on Amazon, look for Xtreme Gardening RTI RT4420 Mykos, 2.2-Pound Bag or similar if you choose to add this.

Step 4: Add some kind of mulch layer, ½ -1½ ” thick onto the top of the bare soil, this could be organic straw, leaves and stems from other plants, or even a green living mulch such as Crimson Clover or Buckwheat seeds. If you do a green living mulch then simply chop and drop as it grows. No wood chips.

Step 5: Add a small handful (or a full handful if you have extra) of red wiggler composting worms to each container/15-gallons of soil. (another great reason to have your own worm farm.) Now this won’t make a huge difference the first cycle, adding the worms is for future cycles so don’t stress out if you can’t add worms the first cycle, but try to get some in there when you can. They can be ordered online from Amazon, look for Uncle Jim’s Composting Worms.

Every month top-dress ¼ – 2 cups of the Soil Charge Pack ingredients per plant depending on the size of the plants and growth rate. It’s ok to add more later if you notice that the plants need more so don’t stress on adding an exact set amount. Remember you are feeding the soil not the plant, the soil is feeding the plant whatever it requests as it requests it. Sprinkle evenly around the base of the plant, keep it at least 3-4” from the stalk. You can gently pull back your mulch and work it into the top layer of soil, or just go ahead and sprinkle it right on top of the mulch and water in. Skip your monthly topdressing if its during the last 2-3 weeks before harvest.

Every month add a few handfuls of worm castings or high-quality compost on top of the mulch and water in. If you are taking care of a lot of plants or you run out of room at the top of the container for more physical compost then substitute this with a basic compost tea, (click here for the recommended compost tea recipe). When the worms become established after a few cycles, then this step can be reduced to every 2 months or even omitted as the worms will continue to make worm castings right there in the container for you as long as you feed them from top-dressing and mulch.

During the growing season chop up and drop any leaves and stems you remove from the plant during the growing season as mulch, in turn creating the best environment for the living soil microbes and worms to live and thrive in. You have created a living, composting, growing container!

No flushing before harvest, just keep adding water like normal. The Soil Charge Pack ingredients are carbon based and not man-made synthetics full of salts so there is nothing to flush out of the soil. This is living organics! You are feeding the living soil with the best of the best organic inputs and the living microbes are taking care of any nutrient or mineral needs of the plant as the plant requests. You are letting the plant make the decisions on what it needs and when it needs it – just how it should be – just like in nature. This is how you reach full genetic potential from your plants.

After harvest use a small shovel/trowel to cut out a hole the correct size for the new transplant going in. Make the hole a little deeper than the new plant going in. Try to be careful and only cut out what you need to remove. If your growing container is large enough you can put the new plant right next to the old stalk from the previous grow. Of course, if your growing from seed just plant the seed without digging a large hole. The old stalk and root system will be left to decay as food for the soil microbes. This also leaves a whole entire established living soil network system with tunnels for the new plant roots to tap right into, giving an explosion of growth as they grow into it. Simply continue on again from Step 3! You can choose to skip Step 5 if you want, either way. I mean if you have a worm farm or extra worm castings or compost then go for it! How many harvests will you get with the same soil? How much money will this style of organic growing save you? Never buy expensive bagged soil or bottled nutrients again!

About your water source

We recommend using chlorine/chloramine free water as to not hurt the living soil microbes. Contact your water company for a water quality report (some are online). If your water has chlorine simply let your water sit out for 24 hours before use so the chlorine can evaporate, it’s nice to add a small fish tank air bubbler to the water while it’s sitting for 24hrs. If your water has chloramine instead of chlorine then we suggest using an R/O filter system to reduce it. If the Ph of your water source is somewhere between 5.9-7.4 (most of America) you won’t need to adjust it or even check it again! The Ph up, and Ph down bottled products kill the soil life. IF you need to lower the Ph of your water use Citric Acid powder from the health food store. IF you need to raise the Ph of your water use Baking Soda. We do suggest to check the Ph of your water at first as there are many different water sources in the world, but the real fact here is that most people will never need to adjust, or even test the Ph of their water again. When we let the plant communicate with a living soil the microbes in the living soil take care of the Ph for us! This simply comes down to the quality of the earth worm castings or compost used when first mixing the soil. Finally, you can get rid of that finicky expensive Ph pen!

If you have any questions or concerns please contact us and we will be glad to answer them. Click Here to Contact Us